Operation Care And Comfort

Operation Care And Comfort

Americans support our Troops serving in times of war in many ways: Writing letters, mailing care packages, welcome home events, or by showing support for a deployed service member or Veteran’s family. Americans open up their hearts, homes, and wallets to show that they support those who serve our country. The unique programs of Operation Care and Comfort (OCC) (an all volunteer 501(c)(3) organization) carries on this tradition allowing caring Americans to donate their time, talent, and treasure to honor those currently serving our country and those who have served.

The Beginning
Operation Care and Comfort was established in April 2003 when the three co-founders decided to combine their efforts to support military troops stationed in combat zones overseas. Starting in a garage in San Jose, they soon ran under the Silicon Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross and thrived. Thanks to the hard work and dedication of its founders and volunteers. OCC became an independent non-profit organization in July 2010.

Care Packages
OCC’s initial focus was providing monthly care packages for 19 deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq. OCC now provides support and comfort to dozens of “adopted” units of deployed U.S. military service members, serving in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other conflict regions. Working within our community and through donations received from all over our country, we assemble and mail care packages to these adopted units until they return home. We are currently supporting dozens of units and ships on a monthly basis. We hold large public care package events at least quarterly, with small packing events in between. Over a million pounds of care packages have been packed and mailed by OCC!

Tickets For Troops
In 2004, OCC worked with the San Francisco Giants on their first “Salute to the Military” game. The SF Giants donated tickets when a local military unit returned home from a long deployment, and that was the start of our Tickets for Troops program. Working with sports teams, promoters, event venues and season ticket holders, OCC has distributed tens of thousands of donated tickets to troops, veterans and their dependents 100% FREE of charge. While we concentrate on Northern California, we sometimes have tickets to events in other areas. All who have served are eligible to request tickets once they sign up for our program.

Adopt A Military Family
In 2005, OCC continued to find ways to support troops, veterans and their families by adding our third program. It’s unique Adopt A Military Family program allowed individuals, organizations and companies the opportunity to anonymously “adopt” a military family throughout the year.

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Today In U.S. Military History August 10th 1945

Today In U.S. Military History August 10th 1945

Just a day after the bombing of Nagasaki, Japan submits its acquiescence to the Potsdam Conference terms of unconditional surrender, as President Harry S. Truman orders a halt to atomic bombing.

Emperor Hirohito, having remained aloof from the daily decisions of prosecuting the war, rubber-stamping the decisions of his War Council, including the decision to bomb Pearl Harbor, finally felt compelled to do more. At the behest of two Cabinet members, the emperor summoned and presided over a special meeting of the Council and implored them to consider accepting the terms of the Potsdam Conference, which meant unconditional surrender.

“It seems obvious that the nation is no longer able to wage war, and its ability to defend its own shores is doubtful.” The Council had been split over the surrender terms; half the members wanted assurances that the emperor would maintain his hereditary and traditional role in a postwar Japan before surrender could be considered. But in light of the bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, Nagasaki on August 9, and the Soviet invasion of Manchuria, as well as the emperor’s own request that the Council “bear the unbearable,” it was agreed: Japan would surrender.

Tokyo released a message to its ambassadors in Switzerland and Sweden, which was then passed on to the Allies. The message formally accepted the Potsdam Declaration but included the proviso that “said Declaration does not comprise any demand which prejudices the prerogatives of His Majesty as sovereign ruler.” When the message reached Washington, President Truman, unwilling to inflict any more suffering on the Japanese people, especially on “all those kids,” ordered a halt to atomic bombing, He also wanted to know whether the stipulation regarding “His Majesty” was a deal breaker.

Negotiations between Washington and Tokyo ensued. Meanwhile, savage fighting continued between Japan and the Soviet Union in Manchuria.

 Today In U.S. Military History August 10th 1945

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Hope For The Warriors

Hope For The Warriors

Mission
We believe those touched by military service can succeed at home by restoring their sense of self, family, and hope. Nationally, Hope For The Warriors provides comprehensive support programs for service members, veterans, and military families that are focused on transition, health and wellness, peer engagement, and connections to community resources.

Core Values
Hope For The Warriors understands the challenges, pride, and joy of being a military family. For today, tomorrow, and years to come, we will strive to meet the changing needs of service members and their families.

Ethos
Hope For The Warriors is a family, united by our shared conviction of honor and sacrifice.

History
Hope For The Warriors was founded by military families aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, NC in 2006 as they witnessed, firsthand, the effects war imparts on service members and their families. Hope For The Warriors has remained grounded in family values as the organization expands both the span of programs offered and the number of wounded, family members, and families of the fallen assisted.
The leadership of the organization remains in the dedicated hands of combat veterans and military family members. Together, our board of directors, staff, and volunteers work tirelessly to serve those who have sacrificed so much. The integrity of our organization is paramount and therefore our representatives are as honorable and noble as our mission and the people we serve.

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This Day In U.S. Military History 9 August 1945

This Day In U.S. Military History 9 August 1945

A second atom bomb is dropped on Japan by the United States, at Nagasaki, resulting finally in Japan’s unconditional surrender. The devastation wrought at Hiroshima was not sufficient to convince the Japanese War Council to accept the Potsdam Conference’s demand for unconditional surrender.

The United States had already planned to drop their second atom bomb, nicknamed “Fat Man,” on August 11 in the event of such recalcitrance, but bad weather expected for that day pushed the date up to August 9th.
So at 1:56 a.m., a specially adapted B-29 bomber, called “Bock’s Car,” after its usual commander, Frederick Bock, took off from Tinian Island under the command of Maj. Charles W. Sweeney. Nagasaki was a shipbuilding center, the very industry intended for destruction.

The bomb was dropped at 11:02 a.m., 1,650 feet above the city. The explosion unleashed the equivalent force of 22,000 tons of TNT. The hills that surrounded the city did a better job of containing the destructive force, but the number killed is estimated at anywhere between 60,000 and 80,000 (exact figures are impossible, the blast having obliterated bodies and disintegrated records).

General Leslie R. Groves, the man responsible for organizing the Manhattan Project, which solved the problem of producing and delivering the nuclear explosion, estimated that another atom bomb would be ready to use against Japan by August 17 or 18-but it was not necessary.

Even though the War Council still remained divided (“It is far too early to say that the war is lost,” opined the Minister of War), Emperor Hirohito, by request of two War Council members eager to end the war, met with the Council and declared that “continuing the war can only result in the annihilation of the Japanese people….” The Emperor of Japan gave his permission for unconditional surrender.

Major Sweeney, the pilot, would in 1956, at age 37, become the youngest brigadier general in the entire peacetime Air Force when he was appointed by the governor of Massachusetts to command the 102nd Tactical Fighter Wing, Massachusetts Air National Guard.

This Day In U.S. Military History 9 August 1945

Private Snafu – A Lecture on Camouflage

Private Snafu – A Lecture on Camouflage

Distributed to all branches of the military, this is one of 26 Private SNAFU (Situation Normal, All F***ed Up) cartoons made by the US Army Signal Corps during World War II to educate and boost the morale of the troops.
These films were never intended for public distribution and were screened for military audiences only.
These stories were unhampered by Hollywood censors of the day and are surprisingly uncivil, racist, sexist and politically incorrect by contemporary standards.

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